RMIT Vietnam NewsRMIT doctoral scholarships offer research opportunities for women

RMIT doctoral scholarships offer research opportunities for women

Wednesday, March 13, 2019 - 11:11

Two educators at well-known universities in Vietnam were each recently awarded the 2019 RMIT Vietnam doctoral scholarship for women. One recipient will examine transnational programs at higher education institutions in Vietnam, and the other on consumer behaviour in the country’s retail industry.

Head of Academic Department, British Education Project, in University of Economics and Law – Vietnam National University Ho Chi Minh City “There are more challenges for women to take part in PhD programs and apply for scholarships…just keep fighting and moving forward.”

With more than five years of management experience in the higher education sector, Nguyen Thi Phuong, Head of Academic Department, British Education Project, in University of Economics and Law – Vietnam National University Ho Chi Minh City, hopes to further develop her research in the field of transnational programs.

“I graduated with an MBA from the transnational program of the University of Gloucestershire (United Kingdom). After that, I was in charge of many senior management positions in transnational programs, which provided me with extensive background knowledge that supported my PhD thesis a lot,” Ms Phuong said.

“In the context of internationalisation in the higher education sector, my research [at RMIT Vietnam] will take an in-depth look at the effect of institutional governance on the performance of transnational programs in Vietnam Higher Education Institutions (HEIs).”

Ms Phuong hopes the outcomes of her research will be useful for higher education administrators who are deploying transnational programs at their HEIs.

She believes women face more challenges than men when it comes to entering PhD programs, as well as applying for scholarships. However, she encourages women who are considering embarking on this journey: “Life isn’t about waiting for the storm to pass, it’s about learning to dance in the rain.”

With more than five years of management experience in the higher education sector, Nguyen Thi Phuong, Head of Academic Department, British Education Project, in University of Economics and Law – Vietnam National University Ho Chi Minh City, hopes to further develop her research in the field of transnational programs.

“I graduated with an MBA from the transnational program of the University of Gloucestershire (United Kingdom). After that, I was in charge of many senior management positions in transnational programs, which provided me with extensive background knowledge that supported my PhD thesis a lot,” Ms Phuong said.

“In the context of internationalisation in the higher education sector, my research [at RMIT Vietnam] will take an in-depth look at the effect of institutional governance on the performance of transnational programs in Vietnam Higher Education Institutions (HEIs).”

Ms Phuong hopes the outcomes of her research will be useful for higher education administrators who are deploying transnational programs at their HEIs.

She believes women face more challenges than men when it comes to entering PhD programs, as well as applying for scholarships. However, she encourages women who are considering embarking on this journey: “Life isn’t about waiting for the storm to pass, it’s about learning to dance in the rain.”

Lecturer of Marketing at the Academy of Finance, Hanoi “The scholarship opens up a whole new world, one that is challenging, but so worth it.”

Meanwhile Nguyen Thi Van Anh, a lecturer of Marketing at the Academy of Finance in Hanoi, will use the doctoral scholarship to fulfil her interest in digital marketing, particularly consumer behaviour.

Over the next three years at RMIT Vietnam, she will study how customers relate to the many retailing channels available to them, and ultimately how they come to choose a channel to purchase a product.

“With an omnichannel retailing environment – where consumers can purchase online, in-person, and through other methods – consumers can start their journey in one channel and end it in another one, as there are no barriers between channels,” Ms Van Anh said.

“In such an environment, it is essential to understand customer behaviour throughout their journey so that companies can better allocate their resources.”

She hopes that her research will help businesses increase the effectiveness of information searches and consumer purchase steps in order to create the best shopping experience for customers.

“While searching PhD programs in Vietnam where I can work on the topic of digital marketing, RMIT Vietnam stood out thanks to its cutting-edge research focus, especially in the field of digital marketing,” Ms Van Anh shared.

“I was also impressed with its professional research environment. I believe I can make the most out of my time there.

“And to be able to study in an international environment in my home country is also a plus.”

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Since 2017, RMIT Vietnam’s doctoral scholarships are offered annually to encourage women to further participate in research, especially in fields like engineering, where female participation in the labour force is low, and in business, where senior leadership is predominantly male. Each scholarship covers the tuition fee of a standard three-year full-time research doctorate, worth more than 700,000,000 VND ($30,750).

Story: Ha Hoang